Posts Tagged ‘Mikhail Pogosyan’

   The Sukhoi/HAL Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA) is a fifth-generation fighter being developed by India and Russia. It is a derivative project from the PAK FA (T-50 is the prototype) being developed for the Indian Air Force (FGFA is the official designation for the Indian version).

Two separate prototypes will be developed, one by Russia and a separate one by India. According to HAL chairman A.K. Baweja (speaking shortly after the India-Russia Inter-Governmental Committee meeting on 18 September 2008), the Russian version of the aircraft will be a single-seater, the Indian version will be a twin seater, analogous to the Su-30MKI which is a twin seat variant of the baseline Su-27. The plane is scheduled to enter series production in 2019.

Development

India will eventually spend over $25 billion to induct 166 PAK FA and 48 FGFA advanced stealth fighter aircraft. This will be in addition to the huge investments to be made in co-developing FGFA, as with the infrastructure required to base, operate and maintain such jets in India. IAF’s Air Chief Marshal Naik said that the FGFA will be a swing-role fighter with advanced avionics, super cruise, stealth to increase survivability, enhanced lethality, 360 degree situational awareness, smart weapons, data-links, high-end mission computers and the like. Along with 126 medium multi-role combat aircraft, which India plans to acquire, 270 Sukhoi-30MKIs contracted from Russia, and 220 indigenous Tejas Light Combat Aircraft, the FGFA will be the mainstay of India’s air combat fleet for the foreseeable future. This, in addition to the remaining 50 odd Mirage 2000 fighters, 61 MIG-29 SMT, and the 125 MIG-21 Bison operational till 2017, will help the IAF to reach the sanctioned strength of 44 squadrons.

The joint-venture borrows heavily from the success of the Brahmos project. Russia and India had agreed in early 2007 to jointly study and develop a Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft Programme (FGFA). On October 27, 2007, Asia Times quoted Sukhoi’s director, Mikhail Pogosyan, “We will share the funding, engineering and intellectual property in a 50-50 proportion.” The Indian version, according to the deal, will be different from the Russian version and specific to Indian requirements. While the Russian version will be a single-pilot fighter, the Indian variant will have single and twin-seat configuration based on its operational doctrine which calls for greater radius of combat operations. The wings and control surfaces need to be reworked for the FGFA. Although, development work has yet to begin, the Russian side has expressed optimism that a test article will be ready for its maiden flight by 2009, one year after PAK FA scheduled maiden flight and induction into service by 2015.

By February 2009, as per Sukhoi General Director Mikhail Pogosyan, India will initially get the same PAK FA fighter of Russia and the only difference will be the software.

In 2011, it was reported that IAF will induct 148 single seat as well as 66 dual seat variants of the FGFA. IAF plans to induct the first lot of aircraft by 2017.

Design

Although there is no reliable information about the PAK FA and FGFA specifications yet, it is known from interviews with people in the Russian Air Force that it will be stealthy, have the ability to supercruise, be outfitted with the next generation of air-to-air, air-to-surface, and air-to-ship missiles, and incorporate an AESA radar. The FGFA will use on its first flights 2 Saturn 117S engines (about 14.5 ton thrust each). The 117S is an advanced version of the AL-31F, but built with the experience gained in the AL-41F program. The AL-41F powered the Mikoyan MFI fighter (Mikoyan Project 1.44). Later versions of the PAK FA will use a completely new engine (17.5 ton thrust each), developed by NPO Saturn or FGUP MMPP Salyut.

Three Russian companies will compete to provide the engines with the final version to be delivered in 2015-2016.

HAL negotiated successfully to get a 25 per cent share of design and development work in the FGFA programme. HAL’s work share will include critical software including the mission computer, navigation systems, most of the cockpit displays, the counter measure dispensing (CMD) systems and modifying Sukhoi’s single-seat prototype into the twin-seat fighter as per the requirement of the Indian Air Force (IAF).

Russian expertise in titanium structures will be complemented by India’s experience in composites like in the fuselage. A total of 500 aircraft are planned with option for further aircraft. Russian Air Force will have 200 single seated and 50 twin-seated PAK FAs while Indian Air Force will get 166 single seated and 48 twin-seated FGFAs. At this stage, the Sukhoi holding is expected to carry out 80% of the work involved. Under the project terms, single-seat fighters will be assembled in Russia, while Hindustan Aeronautics will assemble two-seaters.

According to HAL chairman A.K. Baweja on 16 September 2008, HAL will be contributing largely to composites, cockpits and avionics. HAL is working to enter into a joint development mechanism with Russia for the evolution of the FGFA engine as an upward derivative of the AL-37. Speaking to Flight magazine, United Aircraft chief Mikhail Pogosyan said India is giving engineering inputs covering latest airframe design, Hi-Tech software development and other systems.

PAK FA and FGFA

The difference between PAK FA and the FGFA will be similar to that between Su-30M and Su-30MKI. Su-30M is a standard Russian version of a plane, whereas the Su-30MKI (MKI stands for “Modernizirovannyi Kommercheskiy Indiski” meaning “Modernized Commercial India”) was jointly-developed with India’s Hindustan Aeronautics Limited for the Indian Air Force. The Su-30MKI includes 2.5D Thrust Vectoring Control (TVC) and canards. It is equipped with a multi-national avionics complex sourced from India, Israel, Russia and France. Further the FGFA will be predominantly using weapons of Indian origin such as Astra, a Beyond Visual Range missile (BVR) being developed by India, although in keeping with the Russian BVR doctrine of using a vast variety of different missiles for versatility and unpredictability to countermeasures, it can be expected to have compatibility with many different missile types. Ashok Baweja stated that “The Indian FGFA is significantly different from the Russian PAK FA because a second pilot means the addition of another dimension, development of wings and control surfaces.”

The FGFA may also include systems developed by third parties.

The completed joint Indian/Russian versions of the single seat or two seat fighters will differ from the current flying prototypes through the addition of stealth, supercruise, sensors, networking, and combat avionics for a total of 43 improvements.

Specifications (PAK FA and FGFA – projected)

 characteristics

  • Crew: 2 (pilot)
  • Length: 22.6 m ()
  • Wingspan: 14.2 m (46 ft 7 in)
  • Height: 5.9 m ()
  • Wing area: 78.8 m² (848 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 18,500 kg (40,786 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 26,000 kg (57,320 lb)
  • Useful load: 7,500 kg (16,535 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 34,000 kg ()
  • Powerplant: 2 × Saturn-Lyulka AL-41F turbofan
    • Dry thrust: 96.1 kN (9,800 kgf, 21,605 lbf) each
    • Thrust with afterburner: 152 kN (15,500 kgf, 34,172 lbf) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 2,100 – 2,500 km/h (Mach 2+)  (1,305 mph+)
  • g-limits: (10-11 g)
  • Cruise speed: 1,850 – 2,100 km/h (1,150 – 1,300 mph)
  • Combat radius: 1,500 km  ()
  • Ferry range: 5,500 km (3,400 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 m (65,617 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 350 m/s (68,898 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 330 (normal) – 470 (maximum) kg/m2 (67 (normal) – 96 (maximum) lb/ft2)
  • Thrust/weight: 1.19
  • Runway: 350 m (1,148 ft)
  • Endurance: 3.3 hrs (198 mins)

Armament

  • Guns: 2× 30 mm internal cannon
  • Hardpoints: 16 total, 8 internal, 8 on wings.

Avionics

  • Radar: N050 BRLS AESA/PESA Radar (Enhancement of IRBIS-E) on SU-35
    • Frequency: X (8 – 12 GHz)
    • Diameter: 0.7 m (2 ft 4 in)
    • Targets: 32 tracked, 8 engaged
    • Range: > 400 km (248 mi)
      • EPR: 3 m² (32.3 ft²) at 400 km (248 mi)
      • RCS: 3 m ² to 400 km, 1 m ² to 300 km, 0.5 m ² to 240 km, 0.1m ² to 165 km, 0.01M ² to 90 km.
      • Azimuth: 240 ° (± 120 °)
    • Power: 5,000 W
    • Weight: 65 to 80 kg (143 to 176 lb)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  courtesy :- wikipedia.org