Posts Tagged ‘indian army’

Role Attack helicopter
National origin India
Manufacturer Hindustan Aeronautics Limited
First flight 16 August 2007
Introduction 2012
Status Approved for induction
Primary users Indian Army
Indian Air Force
Indian Navy
Developed from HAL Dhruv

The HAL Rudra (Devanagari: रुद्र, “The God Of The Tempest”) aka ALH-WSI is an armed version of HAL Dhruv. Rudra is equipped with Forward Looking Infra Red and Thermal Imaging Sights Interface, a 20 mm turret gun, 70 mm rocket pods, Anti-tank guided missiles and Air-to-Air Missiles.

Design

The version is equipped with SAAB supplied Integrated Defensive Aids Suite (IDAS) with Electronic Warfare self-protection which is fully integrated into the modern glass cockpit.

ALH-WSI has undergone integration trial for armament and electro-optical systems.

A final round of weapon firing trials is scheduled in September 2011, starting with its 20-mm turret gun, followed by trials of its 70mm rockets and MBDA Mistral air-to-air missiles in November.

Initial Operational Clearance (IOC) is expected by late 2012 with deliveries of the production helicopters starting on or before 2013.

As per the initial orders, close to 70 Rudras are to be supplied to Indian armed forces. “It has comfortably-exceeded the payload and performance requirements at 6 km height. It has integrated sensors, weapons and electronic warfare suite using an upgraded version of the glass cockpit used in the Mk-III. The cockpit avionics is a state-of-the-art technology when it comes to helicopters. The sensors include stabilised day and night cameras, Infra-Red imaging, as well as laser ranging and designation,” sources said.

HAL Rudra can carry self defence systems including radar & missile detectors, IR jammer, chaff & flare dispensers.

Role

Unarmed roles

  • Heliborne assault
  • Logistic support
  • Reconnaissance
  • Air observation post
  • Casuality evacuation
  • Training

Armed roles

  • Anti-tank warfare (ATW)
  • Close air support
  • Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
  • Anti-Surface Vessel (ASV)

Variants

Rudra, or ALH-WSI (Weapon Systems Integrated) has two main versions.

  1. Mark III
    This has Electronic Warfare, countermeasures, sensors and targeting systems installed, but does not feature weapons.[5][6]
  2. Mark IV
    This would have a French Nexter 20 mm turret gun, Belgian 70 mm rockets, and MBDA air to air and air to ground missiles, such as the anti-tank Helina missile.

All these systems have been tested individually.

Role Military UAV
Manufacturer ADE, DRDO
Designer ADE, DRDO
First flight 1995
Status Production
Primary user Indian Army
Produced 12+
Unit cost $4.47million

The DRDO Nishant is an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) developed by India’s ADE (Aeronautical Development Establishment) a branch of DRDO for the Indian Armed Forces. The Nishant UAV is primarily tasked with intelligence gathering over enemy territory and also forreconnaissance, training, surveillance, target designation, artillery fire correction, damage assessment, ELINT and SIGINT. The UAV has an endurance of 4 h 30 min. Nishant has completed development phase and user trials.

The 380 kg (840 lb) Nishant UAV requires rail-launching from a hydro-pneumatic launcher and recovered by a Parachute System. Launches at a velocity of 45 m/s are carried out in 0.6 second with 100 kW power and subsequent launches can be carried out in intervals of 20 minutes. The Mobile Hydro-Pneumatic Launcher (MHPL) system mounted on a Tatra truck weighs 14,000 kg (31,000 lb) and boasts of a life cycle of 1000 launches before requiring overhaul. Nishant is one of the few UAVs in the world in its weight-class capable of being catapult-launched and recovered by using parachute, thus eliminating the need for a runway as in case of conventional take-off and landing with wheels.

Development

To meet the Army’s operational requirement of an RPV it was decided in September 1988 that the Defence Research and Development Organisation would undertake the indigenous development of the UAV. The General Staff Qualitative Requirement (GSQR) was finalised by the Army in May 1990. The Nishant RPV made its first test flight in 1995. In July 1999, for the first time the Indian army deployed its new Nishant UAV system in the fight against guerilla forces backed by Pakistan in Kashmir. Nishant, which had been developed for battlefield surveillance and reconnaissance needs of the Indian Army, was test flown again in early 2002. The indigenous Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) Nishant developed by ADE,DRDO had completed its 100th flight by June 15, 2002. The Indian Army has placed an order for 12 Nishant UAVs along with ground support systems. Nishant Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) developed by DRDO for Indian Army was successfully flight tested near Kolar on 20 June 2008. Nishant has completed development phase and user trials. The present flight tests are pre confirmatory trials before induction into services.

Test flight

On Sunday 5 April 2009 DRDO launched a test flight of the Nishant UAV. The main goal was to test the performance of the Wankel engine used on the UAV. An abandoned World War II runway at a village near Kolar played host to the first ever flight of this indigenous rotary engine-powered UAV. The flight took off on early Sunday morning and climbed to an altitude of 1.8 km (5,900 ft) effortlessly before cruising for a duration of 35 minutes. The air vehicle was recovered safely at the intended place at a dried-up lake, after a total flight duration of 40 min. The engine, a Wankel rotary type, was the developmental project of the DRDO and was jointly designed and developed by NAL, a CSIR laboratory, VRDE, Ahmednagar and ADE, Bangalore. The provisional flight clearance for the first indigenous prototype engine was given by the certifying agency, RCMA. The engine was cleared for flight after rigorous ground endurance test runs. The Wankel engine weighs about 30 kg (70 lb), and this engine type is known for its high power-to-weight ratio in a single rotor category.

DRDO was satisfied with the test results. The performance of the engine during the flight met the requirements of the first flight of a engine in the air vehicle. This 55 hp indigenous engine is expected to replace the present imported engine of Nishant. The critical core engine, including the special cylinder composite nickel–silicon carbide coating and special aluminium alloy castings, was designed and developed by NAL. VRDE developed engine peripherals such as the ignition and fuel systems and ADE developed flight testing. The reconnaissance UAV, which has completed its user trials with the Indian Army, is expected to be handed over to the army shortly.

Nishant UAV again underwent crucial confirmatory user trials at Pokhran in April 2010. The trials began April 20 and were supposed to last for one week. A senior Army official at Pokhran said the trials are moving forward in a very satisfactory manner. “We are checking three crucial parameters: video quality, tracking ability and fall of gunshot [missed distance after firing]. These input performances are critical to our operations in the forward areas,” the official said. DRDO has delivered the first four UAVs to the Indian Army at a cost of 800 million INR ($17.9 million).

According to the Times Of India, two UAVs crash-landed in Jaisalmer district near the India-Pak border due to change in wind direction on Apr 28th and Apr 30th. Confirming the news, a DRDO official said, “The user trials were going on and during the flight there were some technical snags owing to which the craft was landed using parachutes.” He said, “But the landing was done safely and no one was hurt in the process. Though before our officials could reach to get the craft back, villagers damaged the aircraft and took away some equipment.”

On 3rd Feb 2011 Nishant UAV has successfully completed confirmatory trials conducted by the Indian Army at Pokhran, Rajasthan

Features

  • Day/night capability training vehicle
  • Battlefield reconnaissance & surveillance,
  • Target tracking and localization
  • Artillery fire correction
  • All terrain mobility
  • Target designation (using integral laser target designator)
  • Endurance: 4 h 30 min

Ground support systems

  • Mobile hydropneumatic launcher (MHPL)
  • Ground control station (GCS)
  • Antenna vehicle/Ground Data Terminal(GDT)
  • Avionics preparation vehicle(APV)
  • Mechanical maintenance vehicle
  • UAV transportation vehicle
  • Power supply vehicle

characteristics

  • Crew: None
  • Payload: 45 kg
  • Length: 4.63 m (15.2 ft)
  • Wingspan: 6.57 m (21.6 ft)
  • Empty weight: 380 kg (840 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × RE-2-21-P or RE-4-37-P, ()

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 185 km/h
  • Cruise speed: 125 km/h to 150 km/h
  • Range: 160 km (100 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 3,600 m (up to 11,800 ft)

Launch & recovery

  • Launch: Mobile hydropneumatic launcher (MHPL) system
  • Recovery: Parachute + landing bags

courtesy:- wikipedia.org

 

DRDO rather than starting all over again the Arjun Mk.2 will have the same design of Arjun Mk.1, but major changes are planned for the new generation variant of Arjun Tank to keep up with the new technological changes which are been incorporated in the MBT’s world over.

Arjun Mk.2 will have Battle Field Management System (BFMS) which will enable the tank to get feed from UAV‘s and Helicopters, which then enable the Arjun Mk.2 tank crew much aware of their surroundings and better understanding of the battle zone, this will lead to improvement in coordinating with other Friendly tanks in the zone and also avoid Friendly kills, it will also give information regarding enemy tank movement along with their troops and help navigate terrain in the battle zone.

Self-diagnostic system (SDS) will also be added to Arjun Mk.2 which is like a health monitoring system. it will not only tell the tank crew if it is having any problem but also point out the trouble area , it is also important when Tank has taken multiple hits from different position and from different ammunition after a self-diagnose Tank crew will know exact damage inflicted on the Tank .

Arjun Mk.2 will get a new efficient 1500bhp engine which has been in development by DRDO in India its self, they are reports that a Indian Private industry is also working with DRDO on the engine development, currently Arjun Mk.1 is powered by German supplied 1400bhp engine which is quite old in design and technical parameters but still a powerful and respected engine in the world.

NERA (non-explosive reactive armor) will be added to Arjun Mk.2 this will give the tank additional protection against anti-tank munitions, unlike ERA, NERA will enable tank to take multiple hits anti-tank munitions, but also increase the weight of Arjun Mk.2 to 60 tons from its current weight (Arjun Mk.1) of 58 tons.

It is much likely that Arjun Mk.2 will also spot Air-conditioning system for the crew, which will be powered from an APU which will draw its power from the Main engine of the Tank; this will enable the tank crew to operate in higher temperature of desert heat without any discomfort to the tank crew, Arjun Mk.1 already has hardened electronics that function perfectly even in the Rajasthan summer without requiring any Air-conditioning system

The Arjun Mk.2 is to undergo summer and winter trails in 2012. If the tests are satisfactory, then the tank will be able to begin production in 2014.

Specifications:
Weight: 60 tons
Length: 10.638 meters
Width: 3.864 meters
Height: 2.32 meters
Crew: 4 (commander, gunner, loader and driver)

Armor: steel/composite Kanchan armour and NERA
Primary weapon: 120 mm rifled tank gun
Secondary weapon: HCB 12.7 mm AA MG, Mag 7.62 mm Tk715 coaxial MG
Engine: DRDO 1,500hp
Power/weight: 25 hp/ton
Operational range: 435 kilometers
Speed: 75 km/h (45 mph) Road, 42 km/h (25 mph) Cross country

Cost: $13 million est.

FMBT

The Indian Army wants the tank to have an Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) system “to obviate chances of own tanks firing at each other in battle”, and a whole new reliable and secure mobile communication system capable of data transmission, audio and video conference. Protection in the form of soft-kill system requires IR detectors, laser warning, radar warning and devices to instantaneously integrate these signals and control a countermeasure suite. Such systems are threat specific so all would have to be carried on a vehicle to gain protection against more than one part of the EM threat spectrum.

For mobility, in order to achieve ‘extraordinary’ acceleration, the Army observes that it is necessary to seek a compact power pack in the form of a gas turbine. The Army wants an active suspension system with sensors, control units, and a hydraulic power source in combination, to automatically alter the suspension characteristics to more closely match the speed of the vehicle and the terrain profile, especially in Indian terrain conditions.

The Army says it wants a high-performance armour system on its FMBT with advanced materials incorporating the following qualities A. Reduced penetration by most lethal weapons, B. Elimination of parasitic mass leading to a weight reduction, C. Excellent corrosion resistance, D. Inherent thermal and acoustic insulation properties.