Archive for the ‘Warships’ Category

The Indian naval designers have been working on cutting edge ships of the future. CNN-IBN caught up with naval experts at the President’s Fleet Review to find out what the Indian navy fleet will look like, 10 years from now. The Indian Navy will have a three hulled ship or the Trimaran virtually invisible to the enemy radar because of its stealth design. Its deck gun and missiles have been concealed in every respect.

KN Vaidyanathan, DG, Naval Design, said, “Stealth means reduced radar cross section, reduced underwater noise as well as reduced infrared signature apart from other electric signatures.”

“We are also going to use multi-function radars, already our destroyers and new gen frigates are going to have multi-function radars and they are using the vertical launch systems,” he added.

The Trimaran concept design follows in the wake of the Navy’s first stealth design, the Project 17 Shivalik class ships, two of which are now at sea with a third on the way.

But the Navy is banking on the Shivalik’s successor, the Project 17 Alfa stealth vessel, which will have missile silos flush with the deck and torpedo launchers blending along the sides of the vessel. There will also be a concealed hangar for a Kamov helicopter. Naval designers admit that US concepts have influenced some of their ideas.

“If you look at the LCS design of the US Navy, they are moving on the seaframe concept and mission modularity.The idea is to have a basic seaframe for the platform and have a mission module so that you can have role changes for the ship and there can be a quick turnaround of roles,” Vaidyanathan said.

With an eye on the future, the Navy is moving towards modular construction and may even participate in Britain’s Global Combat Ship project where individual navies can use a common low cost platform to fit their own weapons and systems.
From: CNN/IBN

Advertisements

                                       Kamorta class Corvettes are the Indian Navy’s next-generation anti submarine warfare platform, built under Project 28. They are being built at Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE), Kolkata. The first corvette is expected to be delivered to the Indian Navy in 2012. All the four corvettes are planned to be handed over to the Indian Navy by the year 2014.

Project 28 is the primary project for driving indigenisation and developing the warship construction industry in India. The aim with this project is to stipulate unprecedented standards while providing opportunities to Indian vendors to develop expertise with the technology. The project, driven by the Navy’s Directorate of Indigenisation, has been delayed by two years with a cost overrun from the originally estimated INR 28 Billion to INR 70 Billion, primarily to meet this goal.

The order for the first four corvettes was placed in 2003, with construction commencing on August 12, 2005.

Design

The basic design for Project 28 was specified by the Indian Navy’s Directorate of Naval Design, with the detailed design by GRSE. The design includes many stealth features, including reductions in noise and vibration of the vessels.

Displacing around 3000 tons and a length of around 110 metres, these vessels will have a very high percentage of Indian made equipment – either designed indigenuously or built under license through technology transfer agreements.

The DMR 249A hull steel is produced locally by SAIL (Steel Authority of India Limited). The main machinery is raft mounted to reduce acoustic and vibration signatures. Each gear unit and the associated engines will be mounted on a common raft. The vessel will feature automated control and battle damage systems. The Project 28 vessels use diesel engines built by Pielstick of France. DCNS supplied the noise-suppressing raft-mounted gearbox for CODAD propulsion. Wärtsilä India will deliver the low-vibration diesel alternators to power the on-board electronics. Other signature management control features are built in to combat the ship’s infrared, radar-cross signature, noise and magnetic outputs. Two independent interconnected switchboards optimize redundancy and reliability.

It was announced on 21 December 2006 that GRSE awarded France’s DCNS a contract to provide a comprehensive engineering package of raft mounted Propulsion Power Transmission Systems (PPTS) for the four corvettes. Under the contract, DCNS will deliver four propulsion packages (consisting of eight reduction gear units on cradles and either thrust blocks) to GRSE. The company will also provide support to GRSE for the mechanical integration of the propulsion plant. DCNS is partnering with Walchandnagar Industries Limited, to provide the raft mounts and other components, including thrust blocks and systems auxiliaries. The first propulsion package was delivered in 2008, with the remaining three to follow at the rate of one per year until 2011.

Armament is to include a license-built Otobreda 76 mm Super Rapid gun in a stealth mount and the usual assortment of weapons similar to what is found on the Talwar class frigates and Shivalik class frigates including a Klub-N missile system in vertical launchers, two Larsen & Toubro built derivatives of the RBU-6000 anti-submarine rocket launcher, as well as Larsen & Toubro torpedo launchers. Revati, the naval variant of the DRDO-made Central Acquisition Radar (CAR), is a confirmed sensor aboard the vessel. Hangar and aviation facilities will also be standard features.

 

overview
Name: Kamorta class corvette
Builders: GRSE
Operators:
Indian Navy Ensign

Indian Navy

Preceded by: Kora class
Succeeded by: P-28A ASW Corvette
Cost: INR 28-70 Billion
Built: 2005-
In service: 2012-
Building: 4
Planned: 4 + 8 (project 28a)
Major characteristics
Class and type: Project 28
Type: ASW Corvette
Displacement: 2,500 tons
Length: 109.1 m
Beam: 13.7 m
Propulsion: 4 x Pielstick 12 PA6 STC Diesel engines
CODAD, DCNS raft mounted gearbox
Speed: 32 knots
Sensors and
processing systems:
Revati Central Acquisition Radar
EL/M-2221 STGR fire-control radar
BEL Shikari
BEL RAWL02 (Signaal LW08) antenna communication grid – Gigabit Ethernet-based integrated ship borne data network, with a fiber optic cable backbone running through the vessel
HUMSA (Hull Mounted Sonar Array)

Bomber Electronic warfare (EW) suites – BEL Ajanta

Electronic warfare
and decoys:
DESEAVER MK
Armament: 1 X 76.2 mm Oto SRGM
2 x AK-630M CIWS
8 x 3M54 Klub
2 X RBU-6000 (IRL) anti-submarine rocket launcher
16x Barak SAM

2×3 Torpedo tubes

Aircraft carried: 1 Westland Sea King Mk.42B
  • TypeGuided missile destroyers
  • BuilderMazagon Dock Limited (MDL)
  • OperatorIndian Navy
  • Service Entry2012
  • Length163m
  • Beam17.4m
  • Anti-Ship Missiles16 x BrahMos
 The Kolkata Class guided missile destroyers are the new stealth destroyers being built by Mazagon Dock Limited (MDL) for the Indian Navy, under Project 15A. The service entry of the first ship is expected in 2012. The destroyers are preceded by Type 15 Delhi Class destroyers and succeeded by the Project 15B destroyers.
“The Kolkata Class guided missile destroyers are the new stealth destroyers being built by Mazagon Dock Limited (MDL).”

The Indian Government approved the construction of three Kolkata Class destroyers in May 2000. First steel was cut for the lead ship in class, INS Kolkata, in March 2003. Her keel was laid in September 2003.

The ship was launched in March 2006 at Mazagon Dock, Mumbai. It is expected to be commissioned in March 2012.

The keel of INS Kochi was laid in October 2005. It was launched in September 2009 and is scheduled to be commissioned in March 2013.

The last vessel in the class, INS Chennai, was laid in February 2006. It was launched in April 2010 and is due for commissioning in March 2014. The project was delayed due to complex warship building process.

In January 2011, the MDL was awarded a follow on order for the construction of four P-15B destroyers. The P-15B ship will retain the hull form of Kolkata Class and will feature a stealthier flush deck and advanced weapon systems.

Design and features of the Kolkata Class

Conceptualised by the Indian Navy, the detailed design phase for the class was completed by MDL. Kolkata class is a follow-on model of the Delhi class and is fitted with modern weapons and sensor systems. The propulsion system of Delhi Class was also retained with minor upgrades. Most of the systems integrated in the ships are designed and built in India.

The destroyers are also equipped with action information system and atmospheric control system. The modern stealth destroyers will demonstrate superior anti-surface warfare (ASuW) capabilities. The vessel has an overall length of 163m, a beam of 17.4m and a draft of 6.5m. The full load displacement of the ship is 6,800t.

Kolkata Class missile systems

The 16-cell universal vertical launcher module (UVLM) fitted on the ship can launch BrahMos missiles.

There are two vertical launching systems (VLS) for Barak SAM (surface-to-air missile).

BrahMos is a supersonic cruise missile developed by BrahMos Aerospace, a joint venture between India-based Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Russia based NPO Mashinostroyenia (NPOM).

BrahMos missile has a top speed of Mach 2.5 to 2.8 and a maximum range of 290km.

Naval gun systems onboard the Indian destroyers

The main gun fitted forward is a 130mm gun. Four AK-630 close-in weapon systems (CIWS) are being provided for close-in air defence. The AK-630 CIWS can defend the ship from incoming anti-ship missiles and other guided weapons. It has a rate of fire of 5,000 rounds a minute.

Anti-submarine warfare

The anti-submarine warfare is provided by twin-tube torpedo launchers and RBU-6000 smerch-2 ASW rocket launchers. The rockets can be launched against submarines within a range of 6km.

Sensors / radar systems on the Kolkata Class guided missile destroyers

Kolkata Class is equipped with Thales LW-08 long range volume search radar, EL/M-2248 MF-STAR multimission radar and EL/M-2238 L-band STAR surveillance radar from Israel Aerospace Industries.

“The Kolkata Class has a flight deck and enclosed hangar to embark up to two medium-lift helicopters.”

Sonar systems include HUMSA-NG (hull mounted sonar array – new generation) and Nagin active towed array sonar.

The Kolkata Class has a flight deck and enclosed hangar to embark up to two medium-lift helicopters such as HAL Dhruv advanced light helicopter (ALH) and AgustaWestland Sea King helicopter.

The ship is equipped with Elbit Systems Deseaver MK II decoy control and launching system. Deseaver can launch decoys against anti-ship missiles coming from different directions.

Kolkata Class propulsion, power and speed

The combined gas and gas (COGAG) propulsion system integrates twin Zorya M36E gas turbine plant. Four DT-59 reversible gas turbines drive the two propellers via two RG-54 gearboxes.

The two KVM diesel motors are provided by Bergen and Garden Reach. Four Wartsila WCM-1000 generators and Kirloskar AC generators supply onboard electricity. The propulsion system provides a maximum speed of more than 30kt.

 

 

COURTESY:-http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/kolkata-class-guided-missile-destroyers/

Class
Name: Project 17A
Builders: GRSE
Mazagon Dock Limited
Operators:  Indian Navy
Preceded by: P-17 Shivalik class
Cost: Rs. 4000 crore each
US $900 million each
Planned: 7
Type: stealth frigate

PROJECT 17-A                                                                      The Project 17A is the follow on the Project 17 (Shivalik class) frigates for the Indian Navy. A total of seven ships will be built. The ships will be built at Mazagon Dock Limited and at GRSE. The Indian shipyards would start the construction of the The Project 17A is the follow on the Project 17 (Shivalik class) frigates for the Indian Navy. A total of seven ships will be built. The ships will be built at Mazagon Dock Limited and at GRSE. The Indian shipyards would start the construction of the first ship by 2011 after the process of upgradation of the shipyards are completed. The shipyards are being upgraded to incorporate modular construction technique. The anticipated cost for each vessel is above Rs 4,000 crore (approximately US $900 million) and the total deal is expected to be worth more than Rs 45,000 crore (US $10+ billion). The vessel will incorporate the latest indigenous developed stealth features. The first ship is expected to roll out by 2015. Lockheed Martin and Hyundai Heavy Industries have jointly responded to the Project 17A combat systems Request for Information (RFI) issued by Indian Navy. They are offering the Aegis Combat System to be included in its Project 17A frigate proposalfirst ship by 2011 after the process of upgradation of the shipyards are completed. The shipyards are being upgraded to incorporate modular construction technique.

The anticipated cost for each vessel is above Rs 4,000 crore (approximately US $900 million) and the total deal is expected to be worth more than Rs 45,000 crore (US $10+ billion). The vessel will incorporate the latest indigenous developed stealth features. The first ship is expected to roll out by 2015.
Lockheed Martin and Hyundai Heavy Industries have jointly responded to the Project 17A combat systems Request for Information (RFI) issued by Indian Navy. They are offering the Aegis Combat System to be included in its Project 17A frigate proposal.

Design

The design of P-17 has led to creating a wealth of experience which will be applied to the P17A. The P17A frigates will be improve upon the P17 Shivalik class frigates in terms of stealth. It will have covered mooring deck and flush deck mounted (VLM) weapon systems. The number of antennae on the ship will be reduced by using a multifunctional radar. The P17A will also feature better options for roll stabilization. Build times will be cut down and productivity improved through the use of modular integrated construction.

           @india defence