Posts Tagged ‘indian navy’

BOEING P-8I NEPTUNE [K65298] 03The Boeing P-8 Poseidon (ALSO modified as neptune for indian navy) (formerly the Multimission Maritime Aircraft or MMA) is a military aircraft currently being developed for the United States Navy (USN). The aircraft is being developed by Boeing Defense, Space & Security, modified from the 737-800.

The P-8 is intended to conduct anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and shipping interdiction and to engage in an electronic intelligence (ELINT) role. This will involve carrying torpedoes, depth charges, SLAM-ER anti-ship missiles, and other weapons. It will also be able to drop and monitor sonobuoys. It is designed to operate in conjunction with the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance unmanned aerial vehicle. The P-8 has also been ordered by the Indian Navy.

Derivatives

Boeing approached the U.S. Air Force in 2010 about replacing the E-8C Joint STARS fleet with a modified version of the P-8 at the same cost Northrop Grumman proposed for re-engining and upgrading the E-8s. The proposed version is named P-8 Airborne Ground Surveillance (AGS) and would integrate an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, and have ground moving target indicator (GMTI) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capabilities.

The main distinguishing feature of the P-8 AGS is pod-mounted radar, fixed to the lower centerline of the fuselage; the pod is lowered so the engine nacelles do not interrupt the radar’s line of sight. Two aft ventral fins on lower aft provide stability for the aircraft. The P-8 AGS also uses the P-8A’s Raytheon AN/APY-10 multi-mission surface search radar.Boeing has campaigned for a fleet of P-8 AGS aircraft instead of re-engining the E-8s. The Air Force’s Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) of the JSTARS platform began in March 2010 to review options for performing the JSTARS mission. An initial decision on the AOA was expected in September 2011

The P-8 is a militarized version of the 737-800 with 737-900-based wings. The airframe uses a 737-800-based fuselage that is similar to but longer than the 737-700-based C-40 Clipper. The P-8 has a strengthened fuselage and 767-400ER-style raked wingtips, instead of the blended winglets available on 737NG variants. The five operator stations (two Naval Flight Officers plus three enlisted Aviation Warfare Operators/Naval Aircrewman) are mounted in a sideways row, along the port side of the cabin. None of these crew stations have windows. One observer window is located on each side of the forward cabin.

The P-8 features the Raytheon APY-10 multi-mission surface search radar.[29] The P-8I will feature an international version of the APY-10. A short bomb bay for torpedoes and other stores opens behind the wing. The aircraft also includes six additional body fuel tanks for extended range from Marshall Aerospace; three of the tanks are located in the forward cargo compartment and three in the rear. In-flight refueling is via a receptacle on top of the forward fuselage, just aft of the cockpit.

In U.S. service, the Poseidon will be complemented by the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance UAV system, which will provide continuous surveillance. The system is expected to enter service around 2010. Around 40 UAVs based on the RQ-4 Global Hawk will be used in the program. Because of the cancellation of Lockheed Martin’s Aerial Common Sensorproject, Boeing will propose a signals intelligence variant of the P-8 to service the requirement for the U.S. Navy.

INDIA

In January 2008, Boeing proposed the P-8I, a customized export variant of the P-8A, for the Indian Navy. On 4 January 2009, India’sMinistry of Defence signed an agreement with Boeing for the supply of eight P-8Is at a total cost of US$2.1 billion. These aircraft would replace Indian Navy’s aging Tupolev Tu-142M maritime surveillance turboprops. Each aircraft has an average cost of about US$220 million. The deal makes India the first international customer of the P-8, and also marks Boeing’s first military sale to India. In October 2010, India’s Defence Acquisition Council of the Ministry of Defence approved the purchase of four additional P-8Is. In March 2011, it was reported that India was to order four additional P-8s from Boeing later in the year. India plans to order another 12 P-8Is at a later time.

The Data Link II communications technology for the P-8I was received by Boeing from Bharat Electronics Limited in April 2010. The communications system will enable exchange of tactical data and messages between Indian Navy aircraft, ships and shore establishments. Boeing will install the system during P-8I final assembly. The IFF, system from BEL was also handed over to Boeing for integration with P-8I in December 2010.

Flight testing of P-8Is began in July 2012, with deliveries planned to start in 2013. The first P-8I was handed over to an Indian naval team at the Boeing facility at Seattle on 19 December 2012. The Indian Navy is to fly it to India along with the second and third aircraft after they handed over in May and June of next year.

Indian Navy has 8 P-8I aircraft on order; deliveries began in December 2012.

Specifications (P-8A)boeingp81

General characteristics

  • Crew: Flight: 2; Mission: 7
  • Length: 129 ft 5 in (39.47 m)
  • Wingspan: 123 ft 6 in (37.64 m)
  • Height: 42 ft 1 in (12.83 m)
  • Empty weight: 138,300 lb (62,730 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 189,200 lb (85,820 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × CFM56-7B turbofan, 27,000 lbf (120 kN) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 490 knots (907 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 440 kn (815 km/h)
  • Range: 1,200 nmi (2,222 km) 4 hours on station (Anti-submarine warfare mission)
  • Service ceiling: 41,000 ft (12,496 m)

Armament

  • (5 internal and 6 external) SLAM-ER missiles, Mines and Torpedoes.

Avionics

  • Raytheon APY-10 multi-mission surface search radar
  • (Advanced Airborne Sensor surface search radar and SIGINT package to be follow on system)

COURTESY ;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_P-8_Poseidon

In January 2007, after several months of intense negotiations, India and Israel signed a US$330 million deal to co-develop an all new generation of the Barak SAM, which was to be known as the Barak II. It has also been called Barak 8. They have worked out an agreement to develop and produce the long-range Barak air defence system for both the Indian and the Israeli militaries. The initial co-development funding is about US$350 million, of which IAI will finance 50 per cent. The venture is a tripartite one, between the DRDO, the Indian Navy, and IAI. The missile is referred to as the LRSAM in Indian Government literature, and will have a range of 70 km (43 mi).

The new missile, which will be based on the original Barak, is expected to feature a more advanced seeker, alongside range extensions (up to 70 km) that will move it closer to medium range naval systems like the RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow or even the SM-2 Standard. The joint development offer was first made by Israel during Indian Navy Chief Admiral Arun Prakash’s visit to Tel Aviv in 2004. Israel successfully tested its improved Barak II missile on July 30, 2009. The radar system provides 360 degree coverage and the missiles can take down an incoming missile as close as 500 meters away from the ship. Each Barak system (missile container, radar, computers and installation) costs about $24 million. In November 2009 Israel signed a $1.1 billion contract to supply an upgraded tactical Barak-8 air defence system to India.

The dual pulse rocket motor for the SAM was developed by DRDO, and the prototypes were supplied to IAI for integration with IAI systems to develop the complete missile.The other variant of the LRSAM will be fielded by the Indian Air Force. Along with the Akash SAM, the LRSAM fills a longer range requirement and both types will complement each other. Each unit of the MR-SAM, would consist of a command and control center, with an acquisition radar, a guidance radar, and 3 launchers with eight missiles each. A 4-year, US$300 million System Design & Development phase to develop unique system elements and an initial tranche of the land-based missiles is estimated. The radars, C2 centers, TEL’s and missiles will be co-developed by Israel and India. In turn, IAI and its Israeli partners have agreed to transfer all relevant technologies and manufacturing capabilities to India allowing India to manufacture the LRSAM systems locally as well as support them.

In May 2010, the Barak-II missile was successfully test fired at an electronic target and met its initial objectives. The second test of the missile is to be held in India later this year. “More than 70 per cent of the content in the missile being developed with Israel would be indigenous.” DRDO chief V. K. Saraswat told The Economic Times.

Development and tests of the long-range anti-air / anti-missile

“In January 2006, India and Israel signed a $350m agreement to co-develop a new generation long-range surface-to-air missile (LR-SAM) for Indian Navy ships.”

Rafael Advanced Defence Systems and Elta Systems, a wholly owned subsidiary of IAI, were subcontracted for the Barak-8 joint development programme. Rafael provides missile interceptors, while Elta is responsible for the radar system.

The first test of Barak-8 missile took place in Israel in May 2010. The next test is planned to be conducted in Israel in 2012. The weapon qualification programme will involve eight test firings conducted in Israel and India prior to entry into service.

Components of the missile system, including the four-plane MF-STAR radars and shipboard electronic modules were delivered to India for final assembly.

Naval Barak-8 missiles will be installed on the three Project 15A Kolkata Class guided-missile destroyers under construction at the Mazagon shipyard in India. Delivery of the first frigate is scheduled for 2012, and Barak-8 missiles aboard the frigate are expected to become operational in 2013.

Four Project 15B Kolkata Class destroyers will also be armed with extended range surface-to-air missiles (ER-SAM). The extended-range missile can strike targets within the range of 100km

MF-STAR radar used on the jointly developed naval defence system

The MF-STAR radar will provide mid-course guidance updates for the missile initially after the launch from the ship. MF-STAR is a multifunction surveillance track and guidance radar for modern naval ships.

The radar uses multibeam, pulse Doppler and electronic counter-counter measures (ECCM) techniques to detect fast moving and low-RCS targets, even in complex environments / conditions and jamming environments.

The radar system provides 360° degree coverage and allows interception of incoming missile as close as 500m away from the ship. During the terminal phase, the second motor will be fired and active radar seeker will be activated to home on to the target.

Propulsion of the Israeli / Indian surface-to-air missiles

Propulsion power for the missile will be provided by a dual pulse rocket motor developed by DRDO. The prototypes were delivered to IAI for final assembly, along with other systems to produce the complete missile.

The rocket motor provides high manoeuvrability at target interception range throughout the wide envelope of the missile.

Naval barak

Naval Barak-8 is a long-range anti-air and anti-missile naval defence system being developed jointly by Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) and the Defence Research & Development Organisation (DRDO) of India. Surface-to-air missiles (SAM) can counter attack aircraft, UAVs and incoming anti-ship missiles. The missile is expected to enter service with the Indian Navy in 2013.

In January 2006, India and Israel signed a $350m agreement to co-develop a new generation long-range surface-to-air missile (LR-SAM) for Indian Navy ships.

In April 2009, Israel signed a $1.1bn contract to deliver an upgraded Barak-8 air defence system to India. Deliveries are expected to be concluded by 2017.

INS Vishal

Conventionally-Powered Aircraft Carrier

Specifications for the INS Vishal

flag of India
2020

Designation: INS Vishal
Classification Type: Conventionally-Powered Aircraft Carrier
Ship Class: Vikrant-class
Country of Origin: India
Number in Class: 2

Operators: India
 
Ships-in-Class
INS Vikrant; INS Vishal
Dimensions:
Length: 860ft (262.13m)
Beam: 200ft (60.96m)
Draught: 28ft (8.53m)
Performance: 
Surface Speed: 28kts (32mph)
Range: 8,600miles (13,840km)
Armament Suite:
4 x Otobreda 76mm dual purpose cannons
Surface-to-Air Missile Launchers
Close-In Weapon System (CIWS)
Structure: 
Complement: 1,400
Surface Displacement: 65,000tons
Machinery: 
Engine(s): 4 x General Electric LM2500+ gas turbines generating power to 2 x shafts.
 Air Arm: 
The air arm was likely to be hal tejas naval varient, and according to rfi issued earlier its was the contendors of mmrca, but most like it may carry RAFALE onboard, with E-2D hawk eye , and potent ASW helicopters (30 A-10H 3 misc approx)

The INS Vishal will follow her sister, the INS Vikrant, into Indian Navy service in the next decade and sport a higher displacement and flat-top flightdeck.

The INS Vishal (“Immense”) is the second of two new indigenous Indian Navy carrier designs currently under construction (2012). The INS Vishal is following the INS Vikrant into service to which the latter is expected to be commissioned sometime after 2017 due to ongoing project delays. Prior to these two endeavors, the Indian Navy relied largely on existing foreign types of British or Soviet/Russian origin refitted for Indian Navy use and, as such, these new carrier developments will stand as a huge symbol of national pride. The INS Vishal project is headed by the Naval Design Bureau with the vessel requirements expected to be finalized by the end of 2012.For years. the Indian Navy made use of two ex-British Royal Navy carriers under the local names of INS Vikrant (R11) and INS Viraat (R22) though these aging systems eventually passed their prime by the end of the 1980s and thought was given towards their formal retirement. A new indigenous initiative was announced in 1989 intended to stock the Indian Navy with a homegrown solution under the “Air Defence Ships” (ADS) project. Construction would consist of two 28,000 ton vessels centered on the launching and recovery of the British BAe Sea Harrier Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) strike aircraft. However, economic hardship struck the Indian nation and the project fell to naught.In 1999, the economic troubles had subsided to which the indigenous carrier initiative was brought to light once more. By this time, the Sea Harrier stable had grown thin to under a dozen aircraft and a more flexible aircraft carrier solution was directed under the new “Indigenous Aircraft Carrier” initiative. The class would include the initial 40,000 ton INS Vikrant (not to be confused with the original R11) and her sister, the 65,000 ton INS Vishal. Both would be capable of launching the newer Mikoyan MiG-29K Fulcrum navy fighters and navalized helicopters as required. The Vikrant was assigned a STOBAR configuration (Short Take-Off But Arrested Recovery) to which a “ski jump” ramp was affixed to the bow end of the ship for the required short-take off requirement. The Vishal, however, would be drastically different in scope and function, being of the CATOBAR configuration (Catapult-Assisted Take-Off But Arrested Recovery) – in essence a “flat top” deck more in line with American Navy offerings. This particular configuration would now make it possible to launch heavier and dimensionally larger mission-minded fixed-wing aircraft such as Airborne Early Warning (AEW) types and give the Indian Navy a considerable edge in the South Asian-Pacific Theater – particularly against the likes of China and Pakistan.Design plans were drawn up in 2001 to which funding was secured in 2003 and construction of the Vishal began in 2012 (continuing today). At the end of the project, the Vishal will be a conventionally-powered aircraft carrier fitted with 4 x General Electric LM2500+ series gas turbine engines delivering to two shafts. Top speed will be 28 knots in ideal conditions with a range out to 7,500 nautical miles. Dimensions include a running length of 860 feet with a 200 foot beam and 28 foot draught. The crew complement is expected to be 1,400 officers, sailors, service personnel, airmen and mechanics.The bread and butter of the Vishal carrier will be its air wing comprised of 29 fixed-wing aircraft and 10 rotary-wing helicopters. The primary mount is expected to be the Russian Mikoyan MiG-29K Fulcrum, the navalized form of the successful land-based lightweight fighter. These will be supplemented or replaced by the indigenous delta-winged HAL Tejas aircraft (navalized). However, the Indian Navy is also interested in stocking heavier aircraft such as the Sukhoi Su-33, Boeing F/A-18 Hornet or French Dassault Rafale (the Rafale in particular has just been selected by the Indian Air Force to replace its stock of outdated Mikoyan MiG-21 Fishbed fighters). The Grumman E-2 Hawkeye has been mentioned for the fixed-wing AEW role as has a modified AEW version of the Boeing V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor helicopter. Helicopter types expected include the Russian Kamov Ka-31 series (Airborne Early Warning (AEW)) or the British Westland Sea King (Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)) – both navalized for operations at sea/over water.The vessel will be defended by a network of 4 x 76mm Otobreda guns, surface-to-air missile launchers and a Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) such as the 20mm American “Phalanx”. A selex RAN-40L L-band early warning radar (EWR) will be part of the extensive and advanced sensor and processing system.At this writing (2012), the arrival of the INS Vishal is still some time away as the Indian Navy commits to other higher profile requirements. The launch date for the vessel is tentatively scheduled for sometime in 2017 with sea trials to be undertaken in 2020 and formal commissioning in 2022. Sources indicate that the commissioning year is closer to 2025 due to the ambitious nature of the program and much thought given to finding local solutions without foreign assistance. This will push existing carriers such as the INS Viraat into service beyond 2014. The INS Vikramaditya – a converted ex-Soviet/Russian Kiev-class carrier – is scheduled to be commissioned at the end of 2012 as a more viable, modernized solution for the Indian Navy until the arrival of the INS Vikrant and INS Vishal.

Role Attack helicopter
National origin India
Manufacturer Hindustan Aeronautics Limited
First flight 16 August 2007
Introduction 2012
Status Approved for induction
Primary users Indian Army
Indian Air Force
Indian Navy
Developed from HAL Dhruv

The HAL Rudra (Devanagari: रुद्र, “The God Of The Tempest”) aka ALH-WSI is an armed version of HAL Dhruv. Rudra is equipped with Forward Looking Infra Red and Thermal Imaging Sights Interface, a 20 mm turret gun, 70 mm rocket pods, Anti-tank guided missiles and Air-to-Air Missiles.

Design

The version is equipped with SAAB supplied Integrated Defensive Aids Suite (IDAS) with Electronic Warfare self-protection which is fully integrated into the modern glass cockpit.

ALH-WSI has undergone integration trial for armament and electro-optical systems.

A final round of weapon firing trials is scheduled in September 2011, starting with its 20-mm turret gun, followed by trials of its 70mm rockets and MBDA Mistral air-to-air missiles in November.

Initial Operational Clearance (IOC) is expected by late 2012 with deliveries of the production helicopters starting on or before 2013.

As per the initial orders, close to 70 Rudras are to be supplied to Indian armed forces. “It has comfortably-exceeded the payload and performance requirements at 6 km height. It has integrated sensors, weapons and electronic warfare suite using an upgraded version of the glass cockpit used in the Mk-III. The cockpit avionics is a state-of-the-art technology when it comes to helicopters. The sensors include stabilised day and night cameras, Infra-Red imaging, as well as laser ranging and designation,” sources said.

HAL Rudra can carry self defence systems including radar & missile detectors, IR jammer, chaff & flare dispensers.

Role

Unarmed roles

  • Heliborne assault
  • Logistic support
  • Reconnaissance
  • Air observation post
  • Casuality evacuation
  • Training

Armed roles

  • Anti-tank warfare (ATW)
  • Close air support
  • Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
  • Anti-Surface Vessel (ASV)

Variants

Rudra, or ALH-WSI (Weapon Systems Integrated) has two main versions.

  1. Mark III
    This has Electronic Warfare, countermeasures, sensors and targeting systems installed, but does not feature weapons.[5][6]
  2. Mark IV
    This would have a French Nexter 20 mm turret gun, Belgian 70 mm rockets, and MBDA air to air and air to ground missiles, such as the anti-tank Helina missile.

All these systems have been tested individually.

                                       Kamorta class Corvettes are the Indian Navy’s next-generation anti submarine warfare platform, built under Project 28. They are being built at Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE), Kolkata. The first corvette is expected to be delivered to the Indian Navy in 2012. All the four corvettes are planned to be handed over to the Indian Navy by the year 2014.

Project 28 is the primary project for driving indigenisation and developing the warship construction industry in India. The aim with this project is to stipulate unprecedented standards while providing opportunities to Indian vendors to develop expertise with the technology. The project, driven by the Navy’s Directorate of Indigenisation, has been delayed by two years with a cost overrun from the originally estimated INR 28 Billion to INR 70 Billion, primarily to meet this goal.

The order for the first four corvettes was placed in 2003, with construction commencing on August 12, 2005.

Design

The basic design for Project 28 was specified by the Indian Navy’s Directorate of Naval Design, with the detailed design by GRSE. The design includes many stealth features, including reductions in noise and vibration of the vessels.

Displacing around 3000 tons and a length of around 110 metres, these vessels will have a very high percentage of Indian made equipment – either designed indigenuously or built under license through technology transfer agreements.

The DMR 249A hull steel is produced locally by SAIL (Steel Authority of India Limited). The main machinery is raft mounted to reduce acoustic and vibration signatures. Each gear unit and the associated engines will be mounted on a common raft. The vessel will feature automated control and battle damage systems. The Project 28 vessels use diesel engines built by Pielstick of France. DCNS supplied the noise-suppressing raft-mounted gearbox for CODAD propulsion. Wärtsilä India will deliver the low-vibration diesel alternators to power the on-board electronics. Other signature management control features are built in to combat the ship’s infrared, radar-cross signature, noise and magnetic outputs. Two independent interconnected switchboards optimize redundancy and reliability.

It was announced on 21 December 2006 that GRSE awarded France’s DCNS a contract to provide a comprehensive engineering package of raft mounted Propulsion Power Transmission Systems (PPTS) for the four corvettes. Under the contract, DCNS will deliver four propulsion packages (consisting of eight reduction gear units on cradles and either thrust blocks) to GRSE. The company will also provide support to GRSE for the mechanical integration of the propulsion plant. DCNS is partnering with Walchandnagar Industries Limited, to provide the raft mounts and other components, including thrust blocks and systems auxiliaries. The first propulsion package was delivered in 2008, with the remaining three to follow at the rate of one per year until 2011.

Armament is to include a license-built Otobreda 76 mm Super Rapid gun in a stealth mount and the usual assortment of weapons similar to what is found on the Talwar class frigates and Shivalik class frigates including a Klub-N missile system in vertical launchers, two Larsen & Toubro built derivatives of the RBU-6000 anti-submarine rocket launcher, as well as Larsen & Toubro torpedo launchers. Revati, the naval variant of the DRDO-made Central Acquisition Radar (CAR), is a confirmed sensor aboard the vessel. Hangar and aviation facilities will also be standard features.

 

overview
Name: Kamorta class corvette
Builders: GRSE
Operators:
Indian Navy Ensign

Indian Navy

Preceded by: Kora class
Succeeded by: P-28A ASW Corvette
Cost: INR 28-70 Billion
Built: 2005-
In service: 2012-
Building: 4
Planned: 4 + 8 (project 28a)
Major characteristics
Class and type: Project 28
Type: ASW Corvette
Displacement: 2,500 tons
Length: 109.1 m
Beam: 13.7 m
Propulsion: 4 x Pielstick 12 PA6 STC Diesel engines
CODAD, DCNS raft mounted gearbox
Speed: 32 knots
Sensors and
processing systems:
Revati Central Acquisition Radar
EL/M-2221 STGR fire-control radar
BEL Shikari
BEL RAWL02 (Signaal LW08) antenna communication grid – Gigabit Ethernet-based integrated ship borne data network, with a fiber optic cable backbone running through the vessel
HUMSA (Hull Mounted Sonar Array)

Bomber Electronic warfare (EW) suites – BEL Ajanta

Electronic warfare
and decoys:
DESEAVER MK
Armament: 1 X 76.2 mm Oto SRGM
2 x AK-630M CIWS
8 x 3M54 Klub
2 X RBU-6000 (IRL) anti-submarine rocket launcher
16x Barak SAM

2×3 Torpedo tubes

Aircraft carried: 1 Westland Sea King Mk.42B
  • TypeGuided missile destroyers
  • BuilderMazagon Dock Limited (MDL)
  • OperatorIndian Navy
  • Service Entry2012
  • Length163m
  • Beam17.4m
  • Anti-Ship Missiles16 x BrahMos
 The Kolkata Class guided missile destroyers are the new stealth destroyers being built by Mazagon Dock Limited (MDL) for the Indian Navy, under Project 15A. The service entry of the first ship is expected in 2012. The destroyers are preceded by Type 15 Delhi Class destroyers and succeeded by the Project 15B destroyers.
“The Kolkata Class guided missile destroyers are the new stealth destroyers being built by Mazagon Dock Limited (MDL).”

The Indian Government approved the construction of three Kolkata Class destroyers in May 2000. First steel was cut for the lead ship in class, INS Kolkata, in March 2003. Her keel was laid in September 2003.

The ship was launched in March 2006 at Mazagon Dock, Mumbai. It is expected to be commissioned in March 2012.

The keel of INS Kochi was laid in October 2005. It was launched in September 2009 and is scheduled to be commissioned in March 2013.

The last vessel in the class, INS Chennai, was laid in February 2006. It was launched in April 2010 and is due for commissioning in March 2014. The project was delayed due to complex warship building process.

In January 2011, the MDL was awarded a follow on order for the construction of four P-15B destroyers. The P-15B ship will retain the hull form of Kolkata Class and will feature a stealthier flush deck and advanced weapon systems.

Design and features of the Kolkata Class

Conceptualised by the Indian Navy, the detailed design phase for the class was completed by MDL. Kolkata class is a follow-on model of the Delhi class and is fitted with modern weapons and sensor systems. The propulsion system of Delhi Class was also retained with minor upgrades. Most of the systems integrated in the ships are designed and built in India.

The destroyers are also equipped with action information system and atmospheric control system. The modern stealth destroyers will demonstrate superior anti-surface warfare (ASuW) capabilities. The vessel has an overall length of 163m, a beam of 17.4m and a draft of 6.5m. The full load displacement of the ship is 6,800t.

Kolkata Class missile systems

The 16-cell universal vertical launcher module (UVLM) fitted on the ship can launch BrahMos missiles.

There are two vertical launching systems (VLS) for Barak SAM (surface-to-air missile).

BrahMos is a supersonic cruise missile developed by BrahMos Aerospace, a joint venture between India-based Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Russia based NPO Mashinostroyenia (NPOM).

BrahMos missile has a top speed of Mach 2.5 to 2.8 and a maximum range of 290km.

Naval gun systems onboard the Indian destroyers

The main gun fitted forward is a 130mm gun. Four AK-630 close-in weapon systems (CIWS) are being provided for close-in air defence. The AK-630 CIWS can defend the ship from incoming anti-ship missiles and other guided weapons. It has a rate of fire of 5,000 rounds a minute.

Anti-submarine warfare

The anti-submarine warfare is provided by twin-tube torpedo launchers and RBU-6000 smerch-2 ASW rocket launchers. The rockets can be launched against submarines within a range of 6km.

Sensors / radar systems on the Kolkata Class guided missile destroyers

Kolkata Class is equipped with Thales LW-08 long range volume search radar, EL/M-2248 MF-STAR multimission radar and EL/M-2238 L-band STAR surveillance radar from Israel Aerospace Industries.

“The Kolkata Class has a flight deck and enclosed hangar to embark up to two medium-lift helicopters.”

Sonar systems include HUMSA-NG (hull mounted sonar array – new generation) and Nagin active towed array sonar.

The Kolkata Class has a flight deck and enclosed hangar to embark up to two medium-lift helicopters such as HAL Dhruv advanced light helicopter (ALH) and AgustaWestland Sea King helicopter.

The ship is equipped with Elbit Systems Deseaver MK II decoy control and launching system. Deseaver can launch decoys against anti-ship missiles coming from different directions.

Kolkata Class propulsion, power and speed

The combined gas and gas (COGAG) propulsion system integrates twin Zorya M36E gas turbine plant. Four DT-59 reversible gas turbines drive the two propellers via two RG-54 gearboxes.

The two KVM diesel motors are provided by Bergen and Garden Reach. Four Wartsila WCM-1000 generators and Kirloskar AC generators supply onboard electricity. The propulsion system provides a maximum speed of more than 30kt.

 

 

COURTESY:-http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/kolkata-class-guided-missile-destroyers/

Type: Ballistic missile submarine
Displacement: 6,000 tons
Length: 112 m (367 ft)
Beam: 15 m (49 ft) (Est.)
Draft: 10 m (33 ft) (Est.)
Propulsion: 83MW PWR using 40% enricheduranium fuel; 1 turbine (47,000hp/70MW); 1 shaft; 1 7-bladed, high-skew propeller
Speed: 12–15 knots (22–28 km/h) (surfaced); 24 knots (44 km/h) (submerged)
Range: unlimited except by food supplies
Test depth: 300 m (980 ft) (est)
Complement: 95
Sensors and
processing systems:
USHUS Sonar
Armament: Torpedoes: 6 x 21″ (533mm) torpedo tubes – est. 30 charges (torpedoes, missiles or mines)
4 launch tubes (2.4 meter dia each)

  • 12 x K15 SLBM (3 in each launch tube) or
  • 4 x K-4 SLBM (Under development)

arihant class submarine

The Arihant class submarines (Sanskrit: अरिहंत:, meaning “Slayer of Enemies”) are nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines under development by the Indian Navy. The lead vessel of the class, INS Arihant, is expected to complete its harbour acceptance trials in February 2012. Four vessels of the class are under development and expected to be in commission by 2015.

The Arihant class vessels are India’s first indigenously designed and built nuclear submarine. They were developed under the US$2.9 billion Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV) project to design and build nuclear-powered submarines.

The Indian Navy’s Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV) Project to design and construct a nuclear submarine took shape in the 1990s. First confirmation of the project came in 1998 from then Defence Minister, George Fernandes. The initial intent of the project was to design nuclear-powered fast attack submarines, though following Pokhran-II and Indian pledge of no first use, the project was re-aligned towards the design of a ballistic missile submarine in order to complete India’s nuclear triad.

The ATV project overcame many challenges, the primary one being the design and miniaturization of the nuclear reactor. The lead vessel was first floated from its dry dock at a symbolic launch ceremony on 26 July 2009.

The Arihant class submarines are powered by an 83 MW pressurized water reactor (PWR) with highly enriched uranium fuel. The miniaturized naval-version of the reactor was designed and built by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) in Kalpakkam. A land-based prototype of the marine PWR was first built at Kalpakkam. It included a 42-meter section of the submarine’s pressure hull containing the shielding tank with water and the reactor, a control room, as well as an auxiliary control room for monitoring safety parameters. The prototype reactor became critical on 11 November 2003 and was declared operational on 22 September 2006. Successful operation of the prototype for three years yielded the data and the confidence that enabled the production version of the reactor for Arihant.

Separately, infrastructure for testing the reactor subsystems was setup at the Machinery Test Centre in Visakhapatnam. Facilities for loading and replacing the fuel cores of the naval reactors in berthed submarines were also established at the Ship Building Centre.

The hulls for this class were built by Larsen and Toubro at their Hazira shipbuilding facility. Tata Power SED built the control systems for the submarine. The steam turbines and associated systems integrated with the PWR were supplied by Walchandnagar Industries.

The lead vessel underwent a long and extensive process of testing after its “launch” in July 2009. Every sub-system of the propulsion and power systems on board the submarine was repeatedly tested with high-pressure steam trials of all pipelines. Finally, the reactor on board INS Arihant went critical in 2011 when the control rods in the reactor were gradually removed. This was followed by harbour-acceptance trials that included submersion tests by flooding its ballast tanks and controlled dives to limited depths. The sea-acceptance trials are expected to begin in February 2011. This will include operation at different speeds and different depths, before the final weapons acceptance trials, consisting of test-firing of all her SLBMs and torpedoes. Data gathered from her acceptance trials is expected to aid the development of nuclear submarines to follow. INS Arihant is expected to be ready for operational deployment by the end of 2012.

Three more submarines of her class were under construction, as of January 2012. India has decided to construct two more nuclear powered Arihant class submarines.